Motilium Domperidone

Why would anyone take Motilium Domperidone and what is Domperidone?

Motilium Domperidone is a dopamine antagonist used to suppress nausea and vomiting. One of the happy side effects of Domperidone is that it increases lactation. If you were to ask the average doctor what Domperidone is used for, he would say acid reflux and the like.

The Domperidone Prolactin or Domperidone Prolactine relationship is a fortuitous one for mother’s struggling to feed their babies naturally. Domperidone increases milk production by stimulating the production of Prolactin of the pituitary gland.

Every baby has a right to be breastfed. There is no other substance that is better for a newborn than mother’s milk. But what happens when you can’t breastfeed? If all other avenues have failed, taking the drug Domperidone might be the only viable option left. Domperidone to induce lactation is generally prescribed ‘off-label’. In other words, this is not what the drug was originally intended for.

Domperidone long term use is usually only associated with those taking it for gastric disorders. Mothers generally only need to take it for 3-8 weeks, sometimes longer if lactation continues to be difficult without it, or in the case of mothers nursing an adopted baby. The recommended domperidone dosage is 30mg (3 x 10mg domperidone tablets) 3 times a day. It may be necessary to increase this to 40mg, 4 times a day.

Weaning off Domperidone

If you are taking Motilium Domperidone 3 times a day, this equals 9 tablets. As soon as you have an adequate supply of milk, you can drop this to 8 tablets. After a few days, drop to 7 tablets and so on, until you can stop altogether. If your milk supply dries up to a significant extent at any stage, you need to return to the last effective dose and maintain it for a couple of weeks before attempting to reduce it again.

Where to Buy Domperidone

If you want to buy Domperidone or a generic Domperidone drug, speak to your doctor or compounding pharmacy. 

As Motilium Domperidone does not cross the blood brain barrier, it has fewer and milder side effects than other medication used for the same purpose. Information on domperidone side effects in breast-fed babies is hard to come by, presumably because they are rare or non-existent, as babies are only exposed to an extremely small amount via the breast milk.

By Gizelle Bichard

Dr. Frank Nice Interview
Motilium Domperidone and Breastfeeding

Domperidone Conference link

Other pages on breastfeeding problems in connection with motilium domperidone

Oatmeal and milk supply

Lactogenic foods


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