having surgery....need to pump

by amberdove
(wyoming )

Hi my son will be about 12 weeks when I need to have a simple surgery, but I do have to be knocked out, so my Dr says to pump enough for 24 hours. Then I will need to pump and dump milk during that 24 hours...how do I know how much to pump? He is gaining 2 - 2 1/2 oz per day and going thru a spurt right now so I will need to wait a week ...then I only have 3 weeks...if I pump only once per day is that enuf?

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Sep 01, 2013
No need to pump!
by: Lyssa

For the most part, doctors do not know the effect of medications on lactation.

There just haven't been enough studies, or doctors do not find the need to stay up to date on the information.

The Infant Risk Center is a fantastic resource of the most up to date information on what medicines are safe to use and what medicines you need to wait to clear your system and how long that takes.

Most doctors play it safe and just say 24-48 hours without even knowing. I strongly suggest you obtain the list of medication you will be given and call the center(you can do a simple google search for their number).

Usually, it is recommended that the mom is okay to breastfeed upon waking up from general anesthesia. By the time you wake up, the medicine has left the system enough to make it safe to breastfeed. If this is your only concern, then no need to worry about pumping and dumping.

But to answer your question, a baby usually eats 1-1.5oz for every hour between feeds. So that could mean leaving your baby 24-30oz of pumped milk. If you are unable to pump, you could consider obtaining donated milk from another mom.

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pumping with Reynauds

I pump exclusivley because my daughter can't latch, even with lots of lactation support.

I have Reynauds and have frequently seen the effects in my feet and hands, and I have horrible pain from it in my nipples, even with pumping exclusively.

I tried all of the other "remedies" and nothing worked so I am starting Nifedipine and am hoping that will work, the only down fall is that my blood pressure is already low so my doc is a bit nervous about how this will be effected by the meds.

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Nov 15, 2013
Tough decisions
by: Lyssa

Breastfeeding is not always the best or simplest answer for every baby and mother. Sometimes there are problems that make it difficult or impossible. Reynauds is a very difficult condition. It is ver important to stay on top of the condition, symptoms, and monitor treatment.
It seems like you are working on a solution with your doctor and have tried several options already.

If you are unable to nurse, there are other options besides commercial formula such as donor milk from another mother, or making your own formula.

Whatever you decide to do, you are doing the best for you and your baby, and have done an amazing job!

Jul 12, 2014
Alternatives
by: Anonymous

Another thing you may possibly do is hand express. I have similar issues and when I hand express, I don't have the same sensation as when I pump or attempt to breast feed. Good luck!

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Is pumping always nescessary

by Tina
(Bangalore)

Is it always necessary to pump milk by hand, manual or electric pump, or should we pump if we have a problem like mastitis or thrush? when do we start pumping if it is essential?

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Aug 13, 2012
Breastfeeding and pumping
by: Zelda Behr

This is really a personal preference.

Some moms breastfeed and never pump others exclusivity pump.

I pump for 2 reasons, 1. if I have to leave baby with family and 2. when I'm away from my baby to prevent engorgement a drop in milk supply.

If you are going to pump do it in-between feeds.

Here are some more reasons to pump.

-Increasing milk supply.
-Going back to work.
-Giving daddy a chance to feed and bond with baby.
-To relieve engorgement.
-To help with fore milk hind milk imbalance.
-To reduce forceful letdown.

But I cant see why its a must so if you have no need don't bother with it.

Here is more on pumping and breastfeeding...

https://www.breastfeeding-problems.com/breastfeeding-and-pumping.html

Hope this helps.

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Look for a pump that's easy to clean and assemble, what a great suggestion!

by Kendal

I loved your tip to find a breast pump that is easy to assemble and clean. It's important that you don't take too much time breast pumping so making the process faster by having easy assembly and cleaning is a good idea. If possible, practicing assembly before you purchase would be beneficial.

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cheap way to hands free double pump

Thanks so much for the hair tie idea! I was trying to come up with a (cheap!) way to hands free double pump at work and wasn't excited about changing bras every time I pumped! This is genius and extremely cheap to boot! Cheers for the idea!! :)
Problem solved!

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shouldnt breast feeding mom pump, to allow baby/dad to bond?

by Lu
(ohio)

Breadstfeeding parent has a pump but will not use to allow dad to feed. I find this very selfish.

Is it wrong for me to feel she selfish? The baby is 7 wks old n he has only fed her twice and he wants to feed baby. Again, I find this very selfish.

Plus, I feel this is very important time for dad and baby to bond to.








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Thank you

by Christina

This is an amazing story. I too was breastfeeding my daughter when she was born, but I didn’t know she wasn’t latching on correctly and 2 days after we went home we had to rush her to the ER and found out she lost 1lbs and her billy Ruben was very high.

So I had to power pump every 2 hours to feed her. So once she was better and we went back home I did pump exclusively, but then it just got so hard.

Once she turned 2 months we put her on formula and now she’s turning 5 months and I’m trying to get breast milk back. This gives me hope. I have a breast pump and taking fenugreek. I also ordered some cookies to help. I’m pumping every 2 hours. I’m getting tiny tiny bits. But it’s a start

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How much breast milk should I give to my granddaugher

by Shiralee Briggs
(Essex)

I am loving having my granddaughter, whilst my daughter goes to work.

Worrying about her taking a bottle, I put teething gel on the teat and it was a success, she suck the gel and the got her milk.

My problem is now her mum, my daughter thinks she is drinking too much.

She has two feeds, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, the morning one she takes 70- 80mls the afternoon one a little less. She has her breakfast and lunch too.

If she looks for more in the morning I will give her some more, but only if she asks.

Please tell me if I am feeding her too much. She is tiny for her age, but perfect in every way.

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May 05, 2014
Shiralee
by: Tracy

Hi Shiralee

You are feeding her when she askes, which means that you are feeding her on demand. This is perfect.

Every baby is different. If Baby finishes the bottle and cries, you need to give more.

If she spits up after a feeding, you should add less.

Research shows that exclusively breastfed babies take in an average of 750ml per day (this is between 1 month and 6 months), but not all babies take in the same amount of milk; some babies take as little as 570ml or as much as 900 ml per day.

With these estimates a person can calculate the average amount Baby needs:

Step 1 - How many times did she nurse during the day, while Mom was still at home?
Step 2 - Divide 25oz by "step 1" number of breastfeeding sessions.
Step 3 - This amount gives you on average, the amount of expressed milk she will need per feeding.

Hope this helps




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Jackson 6 weeks old

by Francis
(melbourne )

For the past 24 hours Jackson has been on a frenzy and feeding nearly every hour.

We try to feed, play and sleep, or just feed and sleep etc. But at the moment he has only one thing on his mind and thats "Boobie" He is fine weight wise etc, but sleeps very little, even after a big feed.

If we dont feed him, he cries and once he commences feeding, he is happy. Its exhausting. Not to mention he takes too much and he does vomit.

How do we all get through this? We have told the doctors and they say do not deprive him.

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Mar 20, 2018
Feeding habits and routines
by: Lezel

Hi there. Your baby is healthy from what I can gather on your comment.

I would not worry too much about his feeding habits or routine, or lack thereof at this point. If the frequency is too exhausting, you can always try expression with a breast pump or express and store milk in breastmilk bags. That way you can have his supply ready when you need a break from nursing without depriving baby Jack, and mommy gets to de-stress.

You can introduce a bottle and store milk in the quantities you feel should be adequate for him, but not so much that he vomits it out. There is no such thing as a fixed nursing routine or schedule for breastfed babies. These are mostly just guidelines and recorded assumptions based on information obtained from limited studies. Not all babies will adhere to this or fall into the same categories. Keep this in mind. If the baby is healthy and thriving, then he should continue as usual. Try storing away a few of his feeds to heat when you're tired, or you need a breather. That way you and baby will be happy 😊.

I wish you the best.
xxx

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reheating breast milk

How should I reheat the breast milk that is refrigerated but not frozen?

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Apr 09, 2013
heating breast milk
by: Tracy

It is always best to reheat the milk on the stove, just until warm (try not to boil it)

Do not put it in the microwave to heat it, the microware can kill most of the beneficial elements in the breast milk.

Does this answer your question?


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Oct 28, 2013
Warmer
by: Anonymous

I keep a mini crock pot (for dips) with water on and it stays warm then I just pull a bottle out of the fridge and put it in there when she starts to fuss and while I change her and pull it out when warm. Much readier than working over the stove in the middle of the night, same concept though, and it works great!

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